Nature Provides is an 8 x 18-ft mosaic and glass mural installed at the Western State Hospital’s Patient Services Center in Lakewood, WA. The mural with its spherical forms, flower and plant references bursts with whimsical energy; it uses visual means to capture the abundance of nature and its life-enhancing capacities. With its repetitive, circular, and spherical forms the mural refers to life on both the macro and micro level by suggesting a planetary and cosmic sphere as well as a biological, cellular, and atomic realm.

 

Commissioned by Washington State Arts Commission.
Installed: 2020
Fabricator: Miotto Mosaics Art Studio
Photographer: Dale C. Lang

Nature Provides

WSH mural in situ

WSH mural in situ

2020,
WSH in situ sideview

WSH in situ sideview

2020,
WSH with one viewer

WSH with one viewer

2020,
Detail yellow flowers

Detail yellow flowers

2020,
WSH Center detail

WSH Center detail

2020,
WSH detail of flat colored rounds

WSH detail of flat colored rounds

2020,
WSH detail green rounded flats

WSH detail green rounded flats

2020,
WSH with three viewers

WSH with three viewers

2020,

In Memory of My Father is a 20-ft high, 3-ft diameter mosaic column installed at the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Two linear Chinese dragons are set against a decorated background filled with illusionistic bas relief spheres. The Seattle-Tacoma International Airport is a major port of entry to the Far East, and Seattle has a significant portion of Asian-American population, thus the nod to the Orient.

 

Commissioned by Port of Seattle and Art4Culture.
Installed: 2004
Fabricator: Miotto Mosaics Art Studio
Photographers: Spike Mafford and Amy Cheng

In Memory of My Father

In Memory of My Father

In Memory of My Father

In Memory of My Father

Sea-Tac new red dragon

Sea-Tac new red dragon

SeaTac new green dragon

SeaTac new green dragon

In Our Own Backyard features examples of twenty wildflowers native to the State of Idaho. The mural, although stylistically contemporary, borrows its curvilinear shapes from Art Nouveau, a turn of the century art movement based on, and inspired by, ancient Egyptian Art. Across the street from the Bus Terminal is a historical Egyptian Theatre and concert venue inaugurated in 1927.

 

Commissioned by the Boise City Department of Art & History
Installed 2017
Fabricator: Surbeck Waterjet
Photographer: Allison Corona

In Our Own Backyard

In Our Own Backyard

In Our Own Backyard

In Our Own Backyard

In Our Own Backyard

In Our Own Backyard

In Our Own Backyard

In Our Own Backyard

In Our Own Backyard

Located in downtown Odessa, TX, Big Skies consists of four printed vinyl-covered traffic boxes. The images are an imaginative visual metaphor for life in Odessa: the big sky, the flatness of the land, the dryness, oil rigs, nature, and the self-reliance of its people. Odessa’s geographical isolation and limited population makes it hard for arts, culture, and commerce to easily thrive. People are thrown on their own resources and much of life is lived internally. Big Skies uses the visual language of layers, transparency, movement, space, spatial illusion, imagery, abstraction, repetition, and geometry to refer poetically, referentially, to the life we live in our bodies, in our hearts, within our brains, and in our souls. It propounds the notion that life – like an iceberg – exists mostly under the surface.

Commissioned by: Odessa Council for the Arts & Humanities

Installed: 2016

Photographer: Steve Goff

 

 

Big Skies

Big Skies

Big Skies

Big Skies

Big Skies

Big Skies

Big Skies

Big Skies

Big Skies

Big Skies

Big Skies

Nucleic Life Formation consist of two waterjet-cut ceramic tile murals, measuring 6-ft by 22-ft and 10-ft by 13-1/2-ft was installed December 2013 at the Lambert-St. Louis International Airport MetroLink Station. Both designs are suggestive of striated nightscapes crossed by a constellation of “stars” that loosely mimics a DNA double helix. DNA is the basis of all living organisms. For as long as man has gazed up at the night sky he has imaginatively formed constellations by connecting prominent stars. Nucleic Life Formation suggests a universal connection between all living things micro and macro, the cells and the cosmos.

 

Commissioned by Metro-St. Louis
Installation Date: December 2013
Fabricator: Surbeck Waterjet
Installer: Kevin Carraway
CAD: Andrew Dodson
Photographer: Richard Sprengeler

 

Lambert-St. Louis Airport elevator passengers

Lambert-St. Louis Airport elevator passengers

Lambert-St. Louis Airport

Lambert-St. Louis Airport

Lambert-St. Louis Airport full horizontal mural

Lambert-St. Louis Airport full horizontal mural

Lambert-St. Louis Airport small mural detail

Lambert-St. Louis Airport small mural detail

Lambert-St. Louis Airport large mural dots detail

Lambert-St. Louis Airport large mural dots detail

kevin

Celestial Playground is an 8-ft by 32-ft tripartite mosaic mural to be installed June 2013 at the Jacksonville Airport in Jacksonville, FL. Celestial Playground treats the restroom entry and water fountain walls as a continuous space. The design flows from one frame to the next, and from a distance, creates an illusion of deep space. The murals visually reference the sky, the heavens, and the cosmos. Celestial Playground imparts a sense of lightness, a feeling of joy.

 

Commissioned by Jacksonville Aviation Authority
Installation date: Summer 2013
Fabricator: Miotto Mosaics Art Studio
Photographer: Laird Vue, Amy Cheng, Steve Miotto